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Thinking about trying a variable voltage battery? Voltage, ohms, and watts explained.

Skill Level:  Beginner 

Although using a variable voltage battery is not difficult and does not require the user to know any of this information, it does help to understand how changing voltage alters your vapor.  An e-cigarette creates a certain amount of power to vaporize the e-liquid.  This power is measured in watts or wattage.  Layman's terms: the higher the wattage the hotter your coil/atomizer will get.  A different wattage will completely change your vaping experience.  The flavor, vapor output (cloud size), throat hit, and atomizer life can all be altered by changing the wattage at which you vape.  Before subohm tanks, box mods, and high VG was a thing, 8 watts was considered by many to be the vaping "sweet spot".  

 So why do I keep referring to watts when when my battery only adjusts voltage.  Edit:most every vaping device is now wattage based.  Wattage is determined by the voltage (volts) of your battery in combination with the resistance (ohms) of your atomizer.  There is a standard formula called Ohms Law which is used to determine wattage : watts = (voltage x voltage) / ohms.  A freshly charged eGo battery will measure ~ 3.0-3.8 volts with a volt meter. If you were using a 2.5 ohm clearomizer/atomizer, your wattage would be (3.2 x 3.2) / 2.5 = 4.1watts.  4.1 watts is considered to be far too low to achieve an optimal vape.  Some clearomizers are available with lower resistance atomizers or even the option to replace the atomizer for a lower resistance.  Another common resistance that clearomizers and/or atomizers come in is 1.8 ohms.  Even with a 1.8 ohm atomizer, a standard 3.2 volt eGo battery would only produce (3.2 x 3.2) / 1.8 = 5.7 watts.  5.7 watts still far less than 

Using a variable voltage battery allows the user to control their own vapor by means of changing the voltage of their battery.  For example if you were using an eGo C-Twist with a 2.5ohm atomizer, you could change the voltage to 4.5 volts and vape at (4.5 x 4.5) / 2.5 = 8.1 watts, the vaping "sweet spot".  If you change to a clearomizer or atomizer with a different resistance, simply change the voltage and maintain that 8 watt sweet spot.

As I mentioned earlier, understanding this is not necessary to using a variable voltage battery.  All you have to do is play around with the different voltages until you get the vapor that works for you. If you like the idea of controlling the quality of your vapor, I highly recommend you try a variable voltage battery.  

Refer to this chart for safe voltage settings:

 

See you In The Clouds


Luke Gates
Luke Gates

Author



4 Responses

Richard Franks
Richard Franks

August 18, 2015

Thank you, I finally get it now. Very useful.

Jack
Jack

April 05, 2015

So what do the colours indicate? Pointless having a colour chart without a colour key.

Tyler
Tyler

May 02, 2014

thanks! love the chart

Michael R
Michael R

March 27, 2014

Thank you for this!

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